Nerium EHT and Autism

imagejpeg_0As you all know, I have been researching the best ways to help our daughter Sarah. In the past I have worked on making products for her which includes the wonderful essential oils. Making the topical remedies has been really good for her as long as she could tolerate the smell and texture, which is not always an easy task.

I have always had Sarah on vitamins and when she was younger it was recommended by Dr. Bernard Rimland that she take a lot of vitamin b and magnesium. He also recommended Dimethylglycine (DMG). Through circumstances beyond our control we could only give her these supplements for a few years.

It has taken many years, but not to long ago our daughter MarciAnne recommended that maybe we should give Sarah EHT supplements. She said that this now 4 year old company called Nerium has worked with Princeton University and developed this EHT. Here is what EHT is:

WHAT IS EHT®?

The aging process can take a toll on brain function. Over time, vital neuronal connections weaken, which can cause memory loss, slower reaction times and diminished alertness. EHT® Age-Defying Supplement helps protect against mental decline with a groundbreaking formula that includes our exclusive, patented EHT®extract, a natural mixture of bioactive molecules isolated from coffee. For a full list of ingredients, click here. Fortified with other rejuvenating ingredients, including vitamins B6, B12, D3, magnesium citrate, selenium, Huperzine A (which increases focus) and the antioxidant lipoic acid, this supplement:

• Promotes better cognitive function and overall brain health
• Combats oxidative stress and chronic inflammation
• Fortifies and strengthens natural brain functions
• Protects and supports neuronal networking
• Enhances the body’s natural energy stores
• Boosts the body’s immune system
• Increases focus

I was very curious at this point and did a lot of research on EHT. I found out that many sports figures (especially in football) were being helped by EHT.

Below is a short video on how Nerium EHT helps the brain.

I will give further updates on how Sarah does with this exciting and revolutionary new supplement.

 

 

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Faith – Autism and Family Relationships

Family Picture

Family Picture

When you hear the diagnosis of Autism applied to your child, your whole world changes. At first you think that only your life has changed but that is not true. Your whole family dynamic changes and that includes the grandparents as well.

“It’s not what you thought your life would be like,” says Kathleen Patrick. Patrick is vice president of services for Easter Seals New Jersey. Her son, Adam Martin, 11, has an autism spectrum disorder known as pervasive developmental disorder — not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS). Her other son, Mark Martin, 9, is developing typically.

It’s not horrible, just different, Kingsley writes. She suggests that if you spend your life mourning the lost trip to Italy you will never enjoy the special qualities of Holland. After you’re there a bit, she says, you notice the charm –tulips, windmills, Rembrandts.

Whether the child with autism is the first-born, in the middle, or the baby, parents often worry about the effect that dealing with the autism — and the time commitment it involves — will have on the other children. “I think most parents bend over backward so it doesn’t affect the other children,” says McCarton.

In a recent study published in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders,researchers compared siblings of autistic children with siblings of non-disabled children and found those with the autistic sibling were actually better adjusted psychosocially and emotionally. They did find, however, that it’s more difficult for the non-disabled child to cope with the autistic sibling if multiple risk factors such as low income are present.

Sarah's Sisters - Marci and Anna

Sarah’s Sisters – Marci and Anna

Exactly why the siblings of autistic children scored better isn’t known. Wright says they may have a higher level of maturity from observing and being involved in the care of a child with autism. “The message is,” Wright tells WebMD, “lots of siblings are doing OK.”

Marci visiting from out of state on Sarah's birthday.

Marci visiting from out of state on Sarah’s birthday.

Dealing with a diagnosis of autism puts a strain on any marriage. Men and women tend to react to the news differently, according to McCarton, and that can add to the stress.

“Women are profoundly sad. But they hit the ground running,” McCarton says, referring to the typical reaction women have on hearing the diagnosis. “They mobilize. Men often retreat into work.” Also, men often question the diagnosis or deny it.

This is what happened in our family. We had a lot to overcome.

The solution is to make time for each other, which is more easily said than done. Families are already time-strapped dealing with behavioral therapists, many doctor appointments, and above-average financial stress. Even so, experts say, couples have to feed the relationship — even if it’s watching a video together or talking after the kids are asleep.

It is kinda hard to find any time for each other but you must. Our Sarah only required 3 hours of sleep a night, so sleep for me was almost nonexistent. The only time Robert and I had anytime together in the early years was when respite or my mom would babysit. Most of the time it would be my mom, because the people at respite that would babysit would only do it once LOL.

It’s also crucial to steal solo time just for yourself, McCarton tells parents. She asks them: “What were the things you loved before?” When parents protest they have no time or money to indulge themselves, she says: “It doesn’t have to be expensive or take up hours of the day. It can be going to Starbucks and having a cup of coffee by yourself for half an hour. It can be taking a shower for 15 minutes.”

In our family the only alone time I had was when I was in the bathroom. I loved my showers and baths. They did not last long, but they were very much appreciated.

Many people deal with those challenges by opting out, according McCarton, which, she says, is a mistake. She says it’s important to think through what can be done to make the child with autism — who can become extremely upset by changes in routine that come with vacations — more comfortable on a trip.

We traveled a lot, always looking for a better place to live where all of our kids would get the best education and living atmosphere we could find. We were the family that seem to think the grass is always better on the other side. Sarah actually come to like the traveling and she learned to accept different types of people with know judgement. In other words she became a little more flexible.

With more awareness about autism and what it is, parents may expect friends and acquaintances to be accommodating to their autistic child’s needs. Maybe not, says Wright. “People are more aware, but I am not sure they know what to do or how to support” families dealing with it, she says.

Even with the awareness, people can stare when a child with autism displays what they consider odd behavior. “You get to the point where you get a thick skin,” Senator says. “You don’t care if people are staring at your kid.”

I personally never got to the point of having thick skin. I have however had a few confrontations and lost a few friends. My attitude was that if you didn’t accept my child you did not accept me. Maybe I did get a little thicker skin, but not much.

You learn, she says, to take control — even if you don’t feel so in control.

Letting go of that image of what the “ideal” family is can help

“Let yourself go with that and not worry about being a Hallmark card. Nat has taught me to be less uptight about those kinds of things. You can find enjoyment in odd places with these kids.”

Grandma (my Mom) and Sarah.

Grandma (my Mom) and Sarah.

Above all else always remember there is the God factor!

Spiritual life can be an important aspect of overall quality of life – for individuals with autism and the families who support them. Dealing with a disability does not reduce the need for a spiritual life. For some, in fact, the role of faith increases significantly when overwhelmed by the challenges a disability can bring to one’s life or family. A faith community is a cornerstone for spiritual support, and more critical support at a time of crisis. But these communities offer so much more than just support, as they are also a social network hosting activities and events for education, entertainment and relaxation. Additionally, a variety of ministries and volunteer options typically invite members to contribute their time and talents to give back to the community in a meaningful way. Families dealing with autism and developmental disabilities may struggle to feel welcome in these communities, accentuating the already existing feeling of isolation from the community at large. http://www.autism-society.org/living-with-autism/family-issues/autism-and-faith.html

 

 

Autism Linked to Rare Disorders

Neurofibromatosis

Neurofibromatosis (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Autosomal dominant pedigree chart. In Autosoma...

Autosomal dominant pedigree chart. In Autosomal Dominance the chance of receiving and expressing a particular gene is 50% regardless of the sex of parent or child. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: The oldest known case of Noonan syndr...

English: The oldest known case of Noonan syndrome, described in 1883 by Kobylinski (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I thought I would put this information out there to my readers that are in this current situtation. If you are in this situation, I am praying for you.

About one in four people diagnosed with a group of rare disorders have autism, according to a study published 7 October in the Journal of Medical Genetics1. The disorders all affect the same cancer-related pathway, driven by a protein called RAS.

The four rare disorders — neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), Noonan syndrome, Costello syndrome and cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome (CFC) — are bound by one common theme. In each case, a single-gene mutation enhances the signaling of a pathway driven by RAS, earning them the moniker ‘RASopathies.’

Of the four disorders, NF1 has the strongest documented links to autism2, and there are a few reports of autism-like features in people with the other disorders. The new study is the largest to look at the connection, however, and the first to look across multiple RASopathies.

For each participant, caregivers filled out the SCQ or the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) — a parental questionnaire that rates the severity of autism symptoms. The researchers have data from both questionnaires for 439 of the 521 participants.

Based on SCQ scores, the researchers found variable rates of autism among the four disorders. For example, 54 percent of people with CFC have autism, compared with 11 percent of those with NF1. These differences may reflect how severely the disorder disrupts the RAS pathway.

As with autism in general, symptoms of autism are more prevalent in men than in women with RASopathies. However, this also varies across the disorders, with NF1 showing the strongest gender bias (about one-quarter of males and no females with the disorder have autism) and Noonan syndrome showing none.

You can learn more about these rare disorders at this link. https://sfari.org/news-and-opinion/news/2013/cancer-pathway-connects-autism-to-set-of-rare-disorders

It is a great article for which I have taken the above info. from.

 

 

A Broader Life Than Autism

Today I want to write about the circumstances around Autism. What I mean is that most of us who have a child diagnosed with Autism have other children as well.

We have two other beautiful daughters. One of our daughters is married and has two sons. We have two grandsons 🙂 Sarah has two nephews 🙂 One day Sarah will be introduced to her nephews Conner and Kyle.

What I am saying is that we have had Autism in our lives for 24 years. Even though we have had Autism in our lives for so many years it has not been the only thing in our lives.

Sarah’s sisters are very accomplished young ladies and they love Sarah very much. The reason why Sarah has not met her nephews yet, is because she has a problem with children’s noises and they live 3,000 miles away. One day she will meet them and they will have a great time together.

So, until she gets to meet her nephews face to face and not just through the phone and pictures, I would like to introduce you my fellow readers to Sarah’s nephews Conner and Kyle.1273680_4608764836482_951894484_o1270719_4574583661974_411855060_o

We have a broader life now. For so many years Autism was the only focus I had, but not anymore. When my focus shifted to a broader spectrum I was much happier, therefore I had a much more happier family, and now I have been blessed two amazing grandsons.  Sarah’s life is much broader also because she has a better understanding in her faith walk and she has more family and friends to love her.

Sarah has asked me from time to time if Conner and Kyle are ok, meaning that they don’t have Autism. I reassure her that they are just fine.

Just want to let you know…….

2005-09-06 22.34.40I just want to let you know that Sarah’s Voice has a facebook page https://www.facebook.com/SarahsVoice

Come by and check it out. I have lots of information about Autism and lots more pics and videos about Sarah and the family.

You are always invited 🙂 Thanks 🙂

Great Day Autism Or Not

I am not writing about anything in particular other than we had a wonderful day with Sarah at the park today.

There was a live band and great food. We also had live entertainment and Sarah won herself another bag.

We were at the park for 4 hours and having a wonderful time. Partners for Community Living Rocks!!! Thank you all for giving and caring that your clients have a great time 🙂2005-09-06 22.34.40 2005-09-06 21.05.11

Make That Time Count – The Lighter side of Autism

1185909_395897613845200_548738667_nJust because your child may have been diagnosed with a challenge such as Autism or anything else does not mean that you have to toss away all dreams for them.

Autism is just a blanket diagnosis. There is still a child in there that has hopes, dreams and has a personality to boot.

Even though the tough behaviors of your child seem to overtake your entire household, just remember when the good behaviors come out and you see your child’s personality come through cherish it and hold on to it.

I remember not to long ago, when Sarah seen me put on some chap stick, she grabbed my hand and told me not to put it on. I asked her why and she said because it might hurt my lips. I told her that it would be ok because I had been using it for a while. She told me ok, but don’t come crying to me if it hurts you and she walked off in her own teenage way. It took me a while but then I realized we had a regular Mom and daughter moment.

Now, I don’t know about you but when the good moments came I was always waiting for the other shoe to drop. Don’t do that! That kind of thinking will rob you of the joy you felt when your child’s personality came out.

I remember another time when Sarah was abt. 6 or 7 years old. We lived in South Dakota. It was during the winter and the snow drifts were high. Sarah and her sisters were playing outside. Anna was trying to wipe off the snow on the propane tank and Sarah went running over to her, took her hand off the propane tank and told her not to touch it because the tank was hot.

Sarah knew propane heated the house so she assumed that the tank would be hot, out of concern for her sister she pulled her hand off the tank and said what she said. Right at that moment Sarah and Anna had a real sister moment.

Now maybe your child is nonverbal, maybe your child is physically challenged as well. Now matter what they are awesome children of the Lord, so enjoy them! Build them up. Edify them! They are only with us for a short period of time.  Make that time count!

Mother murders her Autistic son

I have read about Dorothy Spourdalakis’s unwavering pursuit to get her son the help he needed. I am sorry that she felt she had no other choice but to murder her own son whom she tried so hard to advocate for.

Let me tell you, for a mother to get to the point where Dorothy Spourdalakis was is horrifying. She had been trying to get help for her son but there was none. Finally all hope had evidently gone from her and she took the only avenue she thought in her disturbed exhausted mind that would put an end to the pain. That was to murder her son Alex who was diagnosed as severely Autistic.

This is a very sad and tragic situation and I am concerned that situations like this will become more and more evident if something is not done to help families that are caring for an Autistic family member.

When your child is diagnosed with Autism there seem to be all sorts of resources for them unless they are to challenged. When they are to challenged with Autism then professionals will mention that the only way you may get help is if you put your child in a state institution under the psychiatric ward.

They can be in the psychiatric ward for usually no longer than 3 or 4 months. If they are not under control by then and are rejected for group home placement ect…. they will get to go back home and then you are back at square one.

I know this from experience and it is one of my guilt factors that I have to press through every day.

I am in no way excusing Dorothy for what she did. What she did was wrong on many levels. I do however understand the exhaustion and frustration of trying to help your challenged child and getting either no response or the run around. I am so grateful to God and my family that I did not get to the point of hoplessness.

People, when you see a family going through this situation don’t scowl at them, help them. A kind word and kind actions go a long way. Just remember this could have been your family just as easily as it was theirs.

1 in 88 or even 1 in 50 diagnosis of Autism is way to many, and it seems to be rising at a rapid rate so don’t ever think it won’t happen to your family.

http://www.nydailynews.com/news/crime/mother-murders-severely-autistic-son-cops-article-1.1371310

ADHD and AUTISM

English: Symptoms of ADHD described by the lit...

English: Symptoms of ADHD described by the literature (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

People are really making so-called educated guesses on what causes Autism. Now so-called professionals are saying that there are more links seen between Autism and ADHD.

 

I am all for doing research to find out what is causing the Autism epidemic or any other mental health crisis that is going on. In my humble opinion pretty soon they are going to be saying Bacon causes Autism, anyway I digress.

 

I do believe that there may be a significant attachment between Autism and ADHD. I have a step daughter with the diagnosis of ADHD but I do not believe she has Autistic symptoms.

 

Please everyone use caution when there is new breaking news about Autism or any other news about any other mental health challenges out their. I am just throwing this news out there in blog land because it may help someone. 

 

Helping and Educating families/people on the Autism Spectrum about Autism is what Sarah and I want to do.

 

MONDAY, Aug. 26 (HealthDay News) — Kids with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are 20 times more likely to exhibit some traits of autism than children without ADHD, according to a new study.

 

One of every five ADHD kids in the study exhibited signs of autism such as slow language development, difficulty interacting with others and problems with emotional control, said study co-author Dr. Joseph Biederman, director of the pediatric psychopharmacology unit at Massachusetts General Hospital.

 

“The genetic markers for ADHD have also been associated with autism,” he said. “These autistic traits may be present in other conditions as well. I am quite convinced that these traits may be present in children with mood and anxiety disorders.”

 

Again, I want to say be cautious and do your own research about this.